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Republic F-105D Thunderchief

20.5k ChiChiWerx  3 months ago

“Attention! Gentlemen, my name is Captain Leroy “Ace” McCool, I am the Tactics Flight Commander here. I want to welcome you to the 335th Fighter Bomber Squadron, the “Chiefs.” You’re the best of the best, the best out of your commissioning sources, the best out of pilot training and the best out of your prior fighter units. And now you’ve been selected to fly the Air Force’s newest fighter bomber, the Republic F-105D Thunderchief, or as we like to call it…the “Thud.” We’re working up to deploy to Takhli Airbase, Thailand to start operations against North Vietnam in the next 90 days…I know, I know, the Thud was designed to carry a nuc at high speed and very low level into the Soviet Union, but the Reds need to be stopped in ‘Nam, unless the rest of the Free World is overrun by the Commie menace. And stop them there we will. For this mission, we’ll be strafing, delivering dumb bombs and…hopefully, for all you fighter pilots, engaging NVAF MiGs when we meet ‘em. You ready?...flight briefings in 15 minutes…attention! Dismissed!”

Cockpit

HISTORY AND CREDITS

This is the Republic F-105D Thunderchief, the USAF’s primary fighter bomber during the early years of the Vietnam War. Introduced to service in 1958, 883 were produced. It was the world’s largest and heaviest single seat fighter, at over a 52,000 lb maximum takeoff weight and took a long runway to get airborne at combat weights, reaching 230 knots (265 mph) on takeoff roll at combat weights. It was also capable of carrying 14,000 lbs of stores, including “dumb” bombs, AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles, as well as an internally mounted M61A1 20mm Gatling-type 6 barrel cannon (firing linkless ammo). The Thud was extremely fast…Mach 2.2 at altitude and supersonic on the deck, capable of stable, very low level flight, rugged and capable. They and their pilots took the fight to North Vietnam and the most dangerous missions against the a Soviet-style integrated air defense system armed with SA-2s, AAA, MiG-17s and MiG-21s. It suffered many losses, 395 total, an almost 48% loss rate, most of those coming from AAA and SAMs, and partly because, for much of the war, the Johnson administration did not allow U.S. aircraft to strike North Vietnamese air bases or SAM emplacements. In return, she claimed 29 MiG-17s, all but one achieved with the M61 cannon. But the willingness to press home the attack was a testament to the valor of the men who flew the Thud.

This is, what I believe, an extremely faithful and accurate SP representation of the Thud, I had to make a couple of concessions to SP and this is an amalgam of several sub variants of the D model, hence the flare/chaff dispenser without a tailhook…but I hope you all enjoy the build, because it is very fun to fly, if you follow the instructions!

Credits to DeezDucks, RamboJutter and BogdanX who provided incredibly valuable feedback, help and assistance throughout the building process. MiG-17 by Mikoyanster. If you have questions, please comment below.


FLIGHT MANUAL

Flight Manual T.O. F-105D-1:

Section I:

AG1 - Nav, Formation and Landing Lights
AG2 - Afterburner
AG3 - Speed Brake
AG-4 - Drop Tanks
AG-5 - Jettison Centerline Stores
AG-6 - Air Refueling Probe
AG-7 - Drogue Chute
VTOL - Flaps
Trim – Trim

Callouts

Section II:


WARNING: This is a large, heavy jet aircraft with a broad speed range. TRIM IS REQUIRED TO MAINTAIN LEVEL FLIGHT throughout the full range of airspeeds. Failure to use trim appropriately will lead to aircraft damage or loss of life!


Takeoff Checklist:

  1. Trim slider - 1/2 notch (25%) down.
  2. Flaps - Full down.
  3. Nosewheel Steering (AG8) - Disable.

CAUTION: Failure to disengage nosewheel steering during takeoff or landing will cause overcontrolling and possible runway departure.


  1. Throttle - 100% military power.
  2. Afterburner (AG2) - Light.
  3. Runway centerline - Maintain with short stabs of rudder.
  4. Rotate between 200 mph (lightweight) and 250 mph (max gross).
  5. Jet will fly off between 230 mph (lightweight) and 260 mph (max gross) .
  6. Once airborne - Gear retract and flaps retract immediately after airborne, trim as necessary with increasing speed.

High Speed Flight: Full throttle with afterburner lit, continue to trim forward until slider approximately 75% (about 3/4 way up).


Note: Jettison centerline stores (AG5) and drop tanks (AG4) in order to achieve highest speeds (900 mph at sea level (S.L.).


“Ace” sez…”Gents, this is a big, heavy jet that flies like the real thing. It will not turn well carrying all stores, so be sure to jettison your bombs and droptanks before trying to dogfight! She’ll fly well, but not if she’s carrying a lot of weight!

“Also, if the glareshield is bouncing, that’s a product of the symmetric airfoil, as you all learned in the T-38, to turn you need to pull to the tickle to turn, but once the shaking gets heavy, you’re just pissing away all your energy and will be dead meat in a fight…or on final!

"In any event, SPEED IS LIFE...if your slats are out...they'll come out below 360 knots (420 mph), you're low on energy and she won't turn! Engage the 'burner and put the nose down to get your energy and turning back!!"


Landing Checklist:


WARNING: Do not attempt to land with bombs loaded! Doing so may cause aircraft damage, destruction or loss of life.
Note: It is highly recommended to burn fuel below 75% prior to landing in order to obtain reasonable approach speeds and landing distances.


  1. Pull power back as necessary to slow down (30-35% recommended), use speedbrake (AG3) as necessary to aid deceleration.
  2. Trim nose up (slider down) as jet slows in order to maintain level flight.
  3. Extend gear at approximately 250-300 mph.
  4. Extend flaps full down below 250 mph.
  5. Make landing approach at 210-220 mph, trim as required (nearly full nose up) and power approximately 15-20%.
  6. Chop power to idle over approach in, aircraft will settle onto runway.
  7. Deploy drogue chute (AG7) upon touchdown.
  8. Brakes as required to slow.

Fly safe and happy hunting!

Dogfight

Spotlights

General Characteristics

  • Successors 1 airplane(s)
  • This plane has been featured
  • Created On Windows
  • Wingspan 35.9ft (11.0m)
  • Length 67.7ft (20.6m)
  • Height 22.1ft (6.7m)
  • Empty Weight 35,621lbs (16,157kg)
  • Loaded Weight 52,119lbs (23,640kg)

Performance

  • Power/Weight Ratio 0.905
  • Wing Loading 68.8lbs/ft2 (335.9kg/m2)
  • Wing Area 757.5ft2 (70.4m2)
  • Drag Points 3038

Parts

  • Number of Parts 1128
  • Control Surfaces 3
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  • Profile image
    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @CapnCrunk also, yes, I also read that story about Deke Slayton...I think that was in the Right Stuff, great story.

    2 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @CapnCrunk well, I’m certainly glad you like it for what it is. I’ve considered putting the bomb bay in, it could be done, though it would take making the Center section out of individual panels and adding to the part count. There’s this movement around here to keep the part count as low as possible, which tends to be impossible if you want to add things like details,lettering, hear doors, etc. or not dumb down the build too much. Anyway, I made the decision early on to delete the bay since it was generally the extra tank later on and there are no nukes in SP anyway, though it would be cool to replicate those doors in game. I spent a lot of time trying to get the flying qualities just right. The SP physics model is a bit simplistic, but not bad if you work around a few things such as the unrealistically high parasite drag model. Though the vast, vast majority of people around here have absolutely zero experience with RL aircraft there are a few of us who do and try and make builds that fly realistically, so they do exist here and there.

    +1 2 months ago
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    And thinking out loud, would it be possible to modify this build with a working bomb bay, for anyone wanting to replicate a Cold War Thud with a tactical nuke in the belly? Neat thing about the 105 is that the bay doors retracted into the fuselage, to reduce drag...but would make for a challenge in SP. By the time they went to SEA, the bomb bays carried an extra fuel tank, and the doors were strapped shut.

    +1 3 months ago
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    I definitely noticed the handling characteristics, which is a nice change of pace from the unrealistic behavior of so many other builds. I also tried to put her into a spin; got up to about 30k in full burner, about 70 degree climb angle. Hit autopilot, and there she went! Tumbled around for a bit, but retarded the throttle, and recovered around 9k. Bit of trivia: one of the Mercury 7 astronauts, Deke Slayton, did spin testing for the F-105. And I gotta say it again, this is one heck of a build. Probably one of the best here, and of my favorite Vietnam era plane. @ChiChiWerx

    +1 3 months ago
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    Yeah sorry, when I used it the first time I guess I did something wrong couldn’t get it up to speed’ tried it again and it worked fine great build@ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @NANOMAN thanks! I thought this one had slipped into oblivion forever!

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @GhostHTX well, thanks! Transitioning into a new job is difficult even in the best of circumstances. Glad to see you’re back, can’t wait to see what you build next.

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @Rhubarb1263 yeah, Overload is good for most things, but it doesn’t do colors. If you want that reflectivity, I guess you could download a build, like this one, that has that color/reflectivity, and delete the build itself while keeping the cockpit and the color palette should remain for you to use. Of course, when you post it, it’ll come up as a successor post.

    3 months ago
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    29.6k GhostHTX

    Hi! You are most welcome- this is a masterpiece. Im good. The last year has been challenging, with a new job that didnt quite pan out (lets just say that the responsibility / stress / workload vs remuneration ratio was a wee bit off). But, I start a whole new job in October and hopefully some balance can be restored to my life. I will be around here more, too! @ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    @ChiChiWerx yeh but i use overload to do the xml stuff

    3 months ago
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    ok I will try that when you said that you do this for a living it reminded of my of when I flew the t-6 simulator and landed (which only me and my dad could do of the 8 of us as we had friends visiting ) but I was the only one to use the flaps and the conversation about them was:

    me: where are the flaps
    person running Sim: dont worry about it
    me: never mind found them
    I then used them knowing what they did and knowing they would let me land slower
    @ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @Nerfenthusiast yeah, so try this: First, you shouldn’t land with any bombs or tanks and you should be less than 75% fuel remaining. This will make it a lot easier. As you slow, extend the flaps fully, trim all the way nose up (slider down), establish a 200-230 mph approach speed (depends on weight, heavier=faster) and carry about 20-25% power until over the end of the runway and close to landing. It’s also important to fly somewhere close to a 3 degree glide path—which is a normal glide path all aircraft fly, too steep and you’ll have too much sink, bounce and crash when you try and round out for the flare. Aim for the approach end of the runway—as you fly in the approach end should just get bigger in the windscreen and your landing point shouldn’t move. You can actually fly it pretty much hands off it you get it on a reasonable glide path, on speed and trimmed up. As you come over the threshold (end of the runway), you should be close to the runway, then chop the power to idle and just barely pull back on the stick to flare. What’s crucial, as on all high-performance aircraft, is properly configured, on speed, on glide path and with some power on (here about 20%). What will make it much easier is less weight. If you have the patience, burn down to almost empty, then try it. I really ought to make a vid on how to do this...I can do it every time, but I do this for a living.

    3 months ago
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    the main reason it crashes for my is it bounces @ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    I knew it was difficult to land and i like how you added the radar reflector on the nose gear too @ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @Nerfenthusiast looking at your comment about landing this thing, the F-105 and other Century series jets (F-100, 101, 102, 104, 106 and F-105 were notoriously difficult to land due to their high landing speeds and highly loaded wings. Making it worse, fighter pilots were coming off the T-33, F-80/84/86, which had comparatively benign landing characteristics. The F-100, which was the first of that generation, was known to do the “Sabre Dance”, which were the post stall gyrations close to the ground from getting too slow on final and usually resulting in fatal crashes. Incredibly, in spite of this, the first F-100A through C models didn’t even have flaps at all. Anyway, the T-38 was designed to fly and land like the Century series jets and I can tell you that thing landed like a rocket. As a result of better training, accident rates improved significantly. So, yes, the tricky landing behavior and small window for errors was also intentional. Glad you tested it fully.

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @GhostHTX thanks for the Spotlight! Where have you been?

    3 months ago
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    I also love testing builds to the limit @ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    yes going to updoot now @ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @Nerfenthusiast well, did you like it then?

    3 months ago
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    ik yeah and it was fully loaded so it stalled fairly fast but was fun to fly had more crashes on landing than successful landings @ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @Nerfenthusiast Like the real jet, this one does not have a 1:1 thrust to weight ratio, so “pulling up 90 degrees”, by which I assume you mean is straight up, and engaging the autopilot will lead to a loss of control and a flat spin, just like in real life. So I’m glad it did what it was supposed to do, I’ve seen that behavior a couple times—and I can recover given enough altitude. The real Thud did that in RL, if it did enter a loss of control event, it was usually recoverable. I spent a lot of time tweaking total drag to produce as realistic performance as possible without increasing engine power so that it would decelerate while climbing steeply. Most builders simply boost power which leads to completely unrealistic acceleration as well as no speed loss in the climb. Additional features besides that realistic acceleration were deceleration due to turning, and deceleration when retarding the throttle, but, unfortunately no one seemed to notice this at all—but nice Job on the recovery and thanks for the comment, glad you had fun with it.

    3 months ago
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    I pulled up to close to 90 degrees then turned on auto pilot and it entered a flat spin while still close to vertical then to recover had to throttle down to stall the plane which pulled the nose down wards which stopped the spin so I could throttle up and pull out of the dive @ChiChiWerx

    3 months ago
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    20.5k ChiChiWerx

    @Rhubarb1263 you can modify the color and reflectivity values in the aircraft XML files...are you on PC by any chance?

    3 months ago
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    How do you get that reflective surface?

    3 months ago
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