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ZEPPELIN-MUHLE

87.2k Treadmill103  one month ago
Auto Credit Based on MAHADI's WWI Challenge

ZEPPELIN-MÜHLE

FLIGHT

Take-off

AG1,AG2, and AG3 on. Apply full Throttle; at 60mph, pull up fully until rear of floats unstick, then level out and hold wings level until speed builds to 80mph or more.

Maintain full Throttle for climb; once at required altitude, Throttle back to 90%.

Use gentle control inputs in normal flight.

Landing

Reduce Throttle to 10%. At 100ft, hold wings level to bleed off speed before descending to flare and land. On touchdown, Throttle off.

Taxiing

AG1 on and AG2 on. Apply 20% Throttle. To steer to Port, AG1 off. To steer to Starboard, AG2 off. Before take-off, ensure AG1 and AG2 are both on and plane is taxiing in a straight line.

Front gun position

AG3 off, AG4 on (see footnote). Use VTOL and Yaw to aim gun.

Rear gun position

AG3 off, AG5 on (see footnote). Use VTOL and Yaw to aim gun.

Bombs and torpedo always available.

BACKGROUND

Fictional Story

What can be learned from an old, faded photograph and where can it lead?

That was the question American university student Emily Muhle asked herself in the Spring of 1967 when she came across a small photo of a strange looking aircraft in an album that had belonged to her late grandfather: He had been a German newspaper journalist who had served in the Kaiserliche Marine and who, like many others, had spoken little of his wartime experiences.

Up to that point, Emily had never taken an interest in aviation, her studies being centered around her high proficiency in pure mathematics but, on a visit to her local library, she came across some books about early aviation and decided to try to discover as much as she could about the strange, unwieldy looking seaplane in her grandfather's photo.

This intriguing path took Emily from the history of aviation through to reading avidly about aerodynamics, studying everything she could about aero-engineering and soaking up as many aspects of the aviation industry as she could, eventually enabling her to graduate with an impressive set of very useful qualifications.

Like most people trying to find their way through their careers, Emily faced many hurdles, but overcame each one with the same focused enthusiasm she had used while studying. Eventually, Emily's hard work enabled her to join one of the most prestigious Aerospace companies in the world and work on one of the most radical projects in aviation history.

On November 22 1988 at USAF Plant 42 in Palmdale California, a set of giant hangar doors opened and the outside world got its first look at a B-2 Spirit Bomber. At the back of the hangar, Emily stood quietly and proudly with her colleagues, watching the media take pictures of a plane whose shape she had helped design.

On Emily's desk at Pico Rivera, next to her monitor, sat a small photo-frame holding that faded picture of a World War One Seaplane.

FOOTNOTE

That was fiddly!

AG3 needs to be off when operating the defensive guns: I needed YAW for traversing the guns so the rudder has to be disabled to stop the whole thing wobbling about. The rotators still impart a little torque but nothing too drastic.

Tried my best to achieve a slow, lumbering flight model for this build and, as always, I messed about with the proportions a little to give the thing a “Treaditional” rather than a fully “traditional” look.

Message to gunners: try not to shoot up your own plane!

General Characteristics

  • Predecessor WWI Challenge
  • Created On Windows
  • Wingspan 90.3ft (27.5m)
  • Length 68.1ft (20.8m)
  • Height 16.4ft (5.0m)
  • Empty Weight -4,734,385lbs (-2,147,483kg)
  • Loaded Weight 12,062lbs (5,471kg)

Performance

  • Horse Power/Weight Ratio 0.049
  • Wing Loading 6.1lbs/ft2 (29.8kg/m2)
  • Wing Area 1,979.5ft2 (183.9m2)
  • Drag Points 5466

Parts

  • Number of Parts 568
  • Control Surfaces 5
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  • Profile image
    87.2k Treadmill103

    Not a replica folks! Just a bit of fun.

    Pinned one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Much appreciated!@Zott

    +1 28 days ago
  • Profile image
    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thanks! Having a lot of fun with WW1 builds at the moment!@AviownCorp

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thanks for checking this out!@tarikGR

    +1 one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thank you!@Strikercritsilver

    +1 one month ago
  • Profile image
    87.2k Treadmill103

    Much appreciated!@JettStorm

    one month ago
  • Profile image
    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thanks again! Lots of fun with these WW1 planes!@Pianoman

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thank you!@DarkRainbow2

    +1 one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thanks as always!@GCPrototypes

    one month ago
  • Profile image
    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thank you!@MDDJB

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thanks! Lots of fiddly wires on this one!@Trainzo

    one month ago
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    36.6k Trainzo

    Very nice plane .

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    More likely the ww2 flying boats and some tri-planes.@ThomasRoderick

    +1 one month ago
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    @Treadmill103 Like that flying barrel ducted fan thingy? Or perhaps that weird jet with the compressor driven by a reciprocating engine?
    .
    ... And why is it always Caproni?

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    I need to look at some Caproni and other Italian designs as inspiration for future HMA builds. I love Italian planes@ThomasRoderick

    +1 one month ago
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    @Treadmill103 Right, IIRC that weird Caproni noviplano also had flight engineers sitting in the engine nacelles, to control the throttles based on the pilot's command, via what's best described as engine telegraph.
    Planes before the invention of modern throttle systems are weird.

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thanks for checking this out!@BeastHunter

    +1 one month ago
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    23.8k Ergithe

    @Treadmill103 yea np:)

    one month ago
  • Profile image
    87.2k Treadmill103

    Much appreciated!@Ergithe

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thanks! Yeah the plane I based this on is the Zeppelin-Staaken 8301. The proportions of my build are somewhat different and in some photos, the engine nacelles had a hapless crewman in a little cockpit between the engines, presumably to control the throttle etc. Strange machines indeed! @ThomasRoderick

    +1 one month ago
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    "Yeah the picture is real but the build itself differs a lot from that series of aircraft"
    "It’s different from that series of planes in a few ways"
    .
    So... would you please be kind enough to tell me what's the actual IRL aircraft?

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thank you!@Type2volkswagen

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Yeah I like to change things up once in a while, especially a challenge like this where it’s low speed.@Liquidfox01

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Well not really a replica; it’s different from that series of planes in a few ways!@TheNightmareCompany

    one month ago
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    87.2k Treadmill103

    Thank you!@TonnkatuTonnkatuThePig

    one month ago
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