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North American F-86F-30

92.9k RicardoACE  6 months ago

CONTROLS

AG:1
AG:2
AG:3 Airbrake
AG:4
AG:5
AG:6 lights
AG:7 Drop external tank
AG:8 canopy

VTOL: Flaps
TRIM

Photos by: ollielebananiaCFSP
FT edensk

Manuel J. Fernandez

Korean War

It was only after nearly a decade in uniform that Captain Fernandez finally experienced battle. His turn came in the Korean War, where he served 124 missions with the 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Group, from September 1952 to May 1953.

He proved to be one of the best combat aviators of his generation. Prior to Capt Fernandez' going to the Korean War, he was an advanced instructor at Nellis Air Force Base Gunnery School in Las Vegas, NV. Fernandez wanted to be part of the action in Korea and several times requested a transfer to the war. At the time the Air Force was reluctant to send its best instructors, preferring they lead the severe training regimen ongoing at Nellis. His requests were denied. Finally in frustration, Fernandez decided to begin a disobedience program.

He began showing up at 5:00 AM – late, drunk, or sometimes AWOL. Ultimately the Air Force was forced into a choice, either court martial him, or send him to Korea. They sent him to Korea where he could use his extreme talents as a fighter pilot. Fernandez was a crack marksman, one of the best in the Air Force at that time in the art of deflection shooting. Fernandez used stealth and cunning to stalk MiGs rather than attacking impetuously.

His modus operandi in combat was to maneuver skillfully and trigger his guns only when he had attained an optimum firing position. Like all top aces in Korea, Fernandez routinely violated Chinese air space by crossing the Yalu River into northeast China to hunt his elusive MiG quarry.

He had a reputation for taking care of his comrades and not being reckless with his wingman's safety in pursuit of air victories. In Korea, he became the third highest ranking American ace with 14.5 kills. What is particularly interesting about this record is that he achieved it in a very short period of time, approximately nine months.

On 13 May 1953, Fernandez was ordered out of Korea. The Air Force was in the habit of sending its aces home early to protect them, and Fernandez was then its #1 ace. Fighter piloting in war frequently carries with it a sense of great competition among the best pilots. By 18 May, Fernandez with 14.5 kills, was ahead of both Air Force Major James Jabara with 14 kills, and Air Force Capt. Joseph McConnell (one of Fernadez's past trainees) with 13 kills. Fernandez had only been in Korea 9 months, while Jabara saw 28 months and McConnell 11 months of combat. On 18 May 1953, Capt. McConnell (DSC) led a two jet mission in North Korea encountering 28 MiG-15s. It was during this last day of McConnell's tour in Korea that he destroyed three MiG's which moved him (16 air victories) ahead of both Fernandez and Jabara.

On 15 July 1953, Jabara earned his last kill bringing his total to 15, and slightly ahead of Fernandez. When Fernandez returned to Nellis, he lamented that had the Air Force permitted him the two additional months, he would have maintained his #1 spot. Such was the state of their competition.

Fernandez returned home at the same time as his friend Joe McConnell, the "ace of aces" who had finished the war with sixteen kills. The two fighter pilots enjoyed a hero's welcome, and were feted in city after city with parades and ceremonial keys. The newly elected president, Dwight Eisenhower, wanted to bask in their reflected glory and invited them for a private "debriefing" in the White House. The fighter pilots' next duty station was California. McConnell got into flight testing, a coveted billet for its excitement and career-enhancing potential, and was sent to newly christened Edwards AFB.

Tomorrow

Spotlights

General Characteristics

  • Successors 1 airplane(s) +7 bonus
  • Created On Android
  • Wingspan 37.6ft (11.5m)
  • Length 37.3ft (11.4m)
  • Height 14.0ft (4.3m)
  • Empty Weight 11,867lbs (5,383kg)
  • Loaded Weight 17,460lbs (7,919kg)

Performance

  • Power/Weight Ratio 0.306
  • Wing Loading 45.4lbs/ft2 (221.5kg/m2)
  • Wing Area 384.8ft2 (35.8m2)
  • Drag Points 298

Parts

  • Number of Parts 1283
  • Control Surfaces 2
  • Performance Cost 4,309
  • Log in to leave a comment
  • Profile image
    30.0k ChiChiWerx

    Nice build, good flight model. You did make one odd choice with the mirror-imaged “USAF” on the bottom of the left wing, I have to wonder where that came from?

    +1 6 months ago
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    30.9k Graingy

    The thumbnail makes it look super stubby
    I was a lil disappointed to find that wasn't the case
    Stubby F-86! We need it!

    6 months ago
  • Profile image

    Excellent work

    6 months ago
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    9,167 Transair56

    Now make it JASDF

    6 months ago
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    finally a good sabre on this website

    6 months ago
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    4,387 ccc12345

    Beautiful bro 😍

    6 months ago
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    1,859 florky

    i need a Philippines version mate

    +3 6 months ago
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    best one I've ever seen wow 10/10

    +1 6 months ago