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Calling real pilots/ aircraft engineers out there.

2,498 Aldriech  1.3 years ago

I am currently making a civilian jet aircraft and I have been wondering about the lights on commercial airplanes. What are the lights needed on civilian/commercial aircrafts? Thank you in advance!

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    2,498 Aldriech

    @ChiChiWerx I have done the lights of the plane, if you are willing, can you check the lights if they are in the appropriate locations?
    Here is the link: https://www.simpleplanes.com/a/zhHach/AKI-01-Ark
    Thanks in advance :)

    1.3 years ago
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    100k Wallaby

    @MrSilverWolf ah yes

    1.3 years ago
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    92.7k MrSilverWolf

    @Wallaby on GA though its mainly just on the leading edge for ice

    1.3 years ago
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    100k Wallaby

    @MrSilverWolf Those are normal "Wing/Inspection Lights" which are used to see literally anything wrong with the wing, mainly at night.

    1.3 years ago
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    92.7k MrSilverWolf

    And some airplanes have these “ice lights” that are on the side of the fuselage by the wing that shine out onto the wing so at night you can see if any ice is built up on the wing
    (If in icing conditions ofc)

    +1 1.3 years ago
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    2,498 Aldriech

    Thank you for the help! @ChiChiWerx

    1.3 years ago
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    28.0k ChiChiWerx

    Oh, and don’t forget the “logo lights”...these are really for lighting up your company’s big logo painted on the tail...advertising, you know. Lit anytime crew is onboard at night and when airborne (below 18,000’).

    +3 1.3 years ago
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    28.0k ChiChiWerx

    Here are the lighting requirement and when those lights should be illuminated:

    Position lights (AKA “Nav lights”): Red light on left wing, near wingtip, green light on left wing, near wingtip, while light at the end of tailcone (sometimes at tip of vertical tail, especially if a T tail). These shine steadily and are typically illuminated whenever there’s power on the jet, even when parked with the engines shutdown. Another variation you’ll see is two wingtip lights, one on top and another on the bottom, typically done if the light cannot be placed at the very end of the wingtip.

    Red anti collision beacon, AKA “rotating beacon”. This one flashes, usually about once a second, either by mechanically turning a light in a housing or just flashing the light if an LED (787). Typically two lights, one on the top of the fuselage and one on the bottom. Illuminated any time the engines are running. Again, you may see multiple lights of the physical position of the light is constrained in where it can go or if there’s something that blocks seeing the light in a certain direction (see “U-2 SPUR Pod”).

    Strobe lights, white: These are the really bright flashing lights, they will typically flash in a pattern, such as two quick flashes, slight pause, two more quick flashes, etc. Illuminated anytime jet takes the runway for departure and is airborne, turned off when exiting the runway. Placement is typically one on top of the fuse, another on the bottom and one at each wingtip.

    Landing, taxi and “turnoff” lights: All are white and designed to illuminate in front of the aircraft and some of each side to allow the pilots to steer without leaving the taxiway or hitting anything. Landing lights are typically bigger and brighter and canted somewhat downwards to illuminate the runway on short final. Turnoff lights illuminate usually when the jet is turning beyond a certain number of degrees to clear the side of the aircraft during the turn. Location depends, but typically on the nose gear strut (taxi), wing roots or they may extend out the bottom of the wing. Again, taxi takeoff and land with the taxi lights on, the landing lights are activated with a switch and usually when the landing gear is extended and the turnoff lights are typically connected with the taxi light switch and activated when the steering tiller is turned a certain amount in each direction.

    Also, don’t get too Funky...most of these lights are simple on/off switches activated by the pilots...

    +11 1.3 years ago
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    17.3k Defalt1

    You can search about it on Google..

    1.3 years ago
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    35.4k ThePilotDude

    @Aldriech no problem

    1.3 years ago
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    2,498 Aldriech

    Thanks! @ThePilotDude

    1.3 years ago
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    35.4k ThePilotDude

    In a simple sense, if you're sitting in the cockpit, there will be a green light on the tip of your right wing, a red one on the tip of the left wing, a strobing white one on the top of the vertical stabilizer, as well as white lights on the wingtips in front of the green and red ones. There are more, but just look up a diagram of aircraft lights and you'll figure it out.

    +4 1.3 years ago
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    2,498 Aldriech

    @Stratus @Botfinder I know that as well. What I want to know is the different lights used on them, or maybe I am just overthinking that there are many more lights used on commercial aircrafts lmao. Thanks to you two though. :)

    1.3 years ago
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    13.0k Botfinder

    @Stratus also not to mention air traffic controllers

    1.3 years ago
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    19.8k Brendorkus

    I’m not a pilot... yet... But, I think they’re so they can be seen by other aircraft at night.

    +1 1.3 years ago